Prescription drug addiction – Part 3: How to treat dependence on opioids

Prescription drug addiction – Part 3: How to treat dependence on opioids

Prescription drug abuse is a serious health problem in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of deaths from prescription opioids like oxycodone, hydrocodone and methadone jumped fourfold between 1999 and 2014. Another data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) shows that nearly 54 million people have used such medications for non-medical purposes at least once in their lifetime. Read more

Tranquilizers abuse–1: Benzodiazepines

Tranquilizers abuse–1: Benzodiazepines

Doctors prescribe tranquilizers to patients suffering from extreme fear, nervousness, worries, anxiety, tension and other associated mental disturbances. The most commonly prescribed tranquilizers include benzodiazepines, thioxanthenes, butyrophenones, phenothiazines, clozapine and rauwolfia alkaloids. Read more

Treatment options for opioid addiction expanding in US

Treatment options for opioid addiction expanding in US

The United States is in the middle of a drug overdose epidemic that has become a leading cause of accidental deaths in the country. According to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2014, drug overdose accounted for 47,055 accidental deaths in the country, of which 28,647 deaths were related to opioid addiction or abuse. Considering the growing number of opioid-related deaths, the U.S. administration has amended previous reforms, including shifts in public policies and new legislations as well as introduced the proposed ones. Read more

Categorize antidepressant ‘SSRI drugs as addictive’

Categorize antidepressant ‘SSRI drugs as addictive’

Antidepressants like Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI), also known as “happy pills,” are common in treating depression patients. The medication makes the user feel light and happy, but it’s often momentary. According to the Danish Health and Medicines Authority, complications may arise when the patients stop taking the pills; they might experience restlessness, insomnia, nausea, disturbed sense of touch and feelings of “electrical shocks” to the head. Read more