Tranquilizers abuse–1: Benzodiazepines

Tranquilizers abuse–1: Benzodiazepines

Doctors prescribe tranquilizers to patients suffering from extreme fear, nervousness, worries, anxiety, tension and other associated mental disturbances. The most commonly prescribed tranquilizers include benzodiazepines, thioxanthenes, butyrophenones, phenothiazines, clozapine and rauwolfia alkaloids. Read more

Carfentanil: New face of opioid epidemic

Carfentanil: New face of opioid epidemic

It’s not just opioid and heroin epidemic that the United States is trying its best to overcome. Law enforcement agencies are also trying to combat another problem area in the form of fentanyl abuse. To add fuel to the fire, now carfentanil, a substance banned for general consumption, is leaving a lethal trail in the U.S. Carfentanil, an analogue of fentanyl, is 10,000 times more potent than morphine and is used to immobilize certain large animals. Termed as an elephant tranquilizer, carfentanil is 100 times more potent than fentanyl. Before being abused, carfentanil was viewed as a chemical weapon. Read more

Differences between antidepressant and antianxiety medication effects

Differences between antidepressant and antianxiety medication effects

Though antidepressant and antianxiety medications have similarities, they also have specific differences, including unique and possible side effects. Those who take either of these as part of a treatment plan will need to be aware of these and discuss them with their doctor to reduce complications. For example, a health professional will need to be made aware of any other medications being taken due to drug interactions. Otherwise, unforeseen risks can be possibilities. This can be doubly so if a person decides to misuse prescription drugs recreationally for any reason. Read more

Categorize antidepressant ‘SSRI drugs as addictive’

Categorize antidepressant ‘SSRI drugs as addictive’

Antidepressants like Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI), also known as “happy pills,” are common in treating depression patients. The medication makes the user feel light and happy, but it’s often momentary. According to the Danish Health and Medicines Authority, complications may arise when the patients stop taking the pills; they might experience restlessness, insomnia, nausea, disturbed sense of touch and feelings of “electrical shocks” to the head. Read more